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Everything You Need to Know About Food Allergies at School

How to Make a Crudité Platter Your Guests Will Actually Want to Eat

How to Make a Crudité Platter Your Guests Will Actually Want to Eat

Nestled between the chicken wings and party mix, a plate of raw veggies is often the leastappealing halftime snack. But when a colorful assortment of in-season vegetables is paired with a variety of creamy homemade dips, you might be surprised at how quickly the platter needs replenishing. We spoke with Sean Wilson, executive chef of Riviera Caterers, and Allison Stowell, nutritionist for Guiding Stars, for their best tips on making crudité the star of the Super Bowl. 1. Choose In-Season Vegetables For a unique and vibrant platter packed with vitamins and nutrients, incorporate veggies that are at their peak this time of year. Purple brussels sprouts, tri-color romanesco cauliflower, grilled radicchio, sliced beets, and roasted butternut squash are all great options. And their flavor isn’t the only thing that will attract party goers: “Guests will be more inclined to eat brightly colored vegetables,” Wilson says….

3 Fruit Cutting Hacks That Will Help Make Everything More Delicious

3 Fruit Cutting Hacks That Will Help Make Everything More Delicious

What You Need – Real Simple Acacia Wood Chopping Board – Avocado, grapefruit, or pineapple – Chefs knife How to Dice an Avocado 1. Cut the avocado in half lengthwise. 2. Twist the halves apart. 3. Whack the pit with your knife and twist to remove. 4. Slice the flesh into a grid. 5. Scoop out the flesh with a spoon. 6. Eat or add to your favorite dish. How to Segment a Grapefruit 1. Cut off top and bottom of grapefruit. 2. Stand upright and cut off the peel and pith. 3. Hold grapefruit over a bowl and use your knife to cut along the membranes between each segment. 4. Release the segments into the bowl. 5. Squeeze any remaining juice into the bowl. 6. Eat or add to your favorite dish. How to Cut a Pineapple 1. Cut off top…

How to Make The World’s Best Vegetarian Stuffing

How to Make The World’s Best Vegetarian Stuffing

People have passionate opinions about stuffing–which makes tinkering with tradition a real challenge. But if your guest list includes vegetarians, there’s no reason for them to feel left out: we’ve come up with a flavorful, golden, herb-scented meat-free version that’s sure to win over stuffing-lovers of every stripe. Get the recipe for The Best Vegetarian Stuffing, and read about why it works below. 1. Save Time Although you can’t bake this stuffing ahead of time because it would lose its crispy-on-the-outside, moist-on-the-inside texture, you can make the elements ahead, so the only thing you have to do on the day-of is combine and cook. On Thanksgiving, if you’re pressed for time (and what cook isn’t?), prep all the ingredients and follow the recipe steps all the way through cooking the vegetables. Then, an hour or so before show time, heat the…

7 Tips for Making a Restaurant-Quality Salad

The Secret Ingredient That Makes Pretty Much Everything More Delicious

The Secret Ingredient That Makes Pretty Much Everything More Delicious

Tea, especially one as fragrant as Early Grey, can elevate a dish more than you’d think. Mixing tea leaves into a shortbread dough, using brewed tea as the secret ingredient in a glaze, or infusing tea with aromatics to yield a cooking liquid for fish, are all delicious ways to use up a box of black tea, or simply, an excuse to go buy one. 1. Earl Grey Shortbreads Buttery shortbread cookies get the fragrant treatment with a touch of Early Grey tea leaves. Of course they’re magnificent on their own, but can easily be used to elevate a simple dessert like crushed over a bowl of ice cream or as a layer in a trifle (also crushed). The possibilities are endless and these cookies couldn’t be easier to make. Get the recipe: Earl Grey Shortbreads 2. Earl Grey-Poached Cod…

Everything You Need to Know About Cooking with Chiles and Peppers

Everything You Need to Know About Cooking with Chiles and Peppers

Ready to turn up the heat? Our guide to chiles and peppers—in peak season now—will help you distinguish your poblanos from your serranos. 1. The Basics: Habannero Super-spicy and distinctively fruity, habaneros range in color from green to red. Their robust heat stands up well to grilled meats. 2. Shishito Wrinkled, sweet, and delicate, these Japanese peppers are best when blistered in a hot pan. Serve with a squeeze of lemon juice and a sprinkle of flaky salt. 3. Jalapeño Commonly used in salsas and hot sauce (sriracha is made from red ones), these are your gateway chile. For less heat, remove the seeds and pith. 4. Serrano Just up the Scoville scale (that’s the chile heat index) from jalapeños, these slender green chiles give an extra kick. 5. Bell Pepper Mild, juicy bell peppers come in green (slightly bitter) and…

Why Experts Think You Should Skip the Milk and Bread and Head Straight to the Produce Aisle Before an Emergency

Why Experts Think You Should Skip the Milk and Bread and Head Straight to the Produce Aisle Before an Emergency

Weather emergencies are no joke. Hurricane season has already begun, and though I’ve never lived through a bad one, I did make it through this winter’s east coast blizzard, and I’ve dealt with plenty of power outages during serious summer thunderstorms. Whenever the weather channel tells me sh*t’s about to get real, I trudge to the grocery store with my reusable canvas bags and my credit card and practically buy out the entire canned foods aisle, plus bread, milk, and bottled water. Turns out, I’ve been doing it all wrong. I mean, there are plenty of things you should always keep in your pantry (from peanut butter, to crackers, canned tuna, soups and bottled water), but when you’ve got time to shop before a natural disaster strikes, it’s most important to stock up on fresh produce, says Barry Swanson, a…

Charcoal – What Is Meant By ‘Activated’ And ‘Natural’

Charcoal – What Is Meant By ‘Activated’ And ‘Natural’

Charcoal comes in two forms, natural and activated. ‘Activated’ charcoal is made when the raw material (usually nut shells) goes through a forced process where it is carbonised at temperatures up to 12000C and acid washed to produce a friable, very fine powder.  This is called a super-adsorbent.  This type of charcoal does not occur naturally and has to go through the above industrial processes to be created.  The end product contains no oxygen, nutrients or fibre, all having been burnt off. The super-adsorbent properties of ‘activated’ charcoal, with prolonged use, are known to take nutrients out of living structures.  Basically, it competes with nutrients at the cell wall and removes almost everything it comes into contact with. This is what they administer if you’re taken to hospital with a drug /poison overdose.  It empties your system of…