Escalivada (Smoky Slow-Roasted Vegetables)

Time to make: 2 hr 15 mins
Serves: 6
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Ingredients

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/265770/escalivada-smoky-slow-roasted-vegetables/

To make ahead: Prepare through Step 4 and refrigerate for up to 1 day. Bring to room temperature before serving. Equipment: Kitchen string
Serving size: 1 cup Per serving: 168 calories; 13 g fat(2 g sat); 3 g fiber; 12 g carbohydrates; 2 g protein; 3 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 7 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,043 IU vitamin A; 84 mg vitamin C; 30 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 376 mg sodium; 486 mg potassium Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (140% daily value), Vitamin A (21% dv) Carbohydrate Servings: 1 Exchanges: 2 vegetable, 2½ fat
This vegan side dish is traditionally served at room temperature with grilled meat or fish, but feel free to double your portion and eat it as a vegan entree with crusty bread for dipping in that garlicky, flavor-packed olive oil. The name for this combination of roasted vegetables comes from the Catalan escalivar, meaning to cook in ashes, though most folks these days use an oven or grill to put some char on their veggies.
Description

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/265770/escalivada-smoky-slow-roasted-vegetables/

Variations
To make ahead: Prepare through Step 4 and refrigerate for up to 1 day. Bring to room temperature before serving. Equipment: Kitchen string
Nutrition info
Serving size: 1 cup Per serving: 168 calories; 13 g fat(2 g sat); 3 g fiber; 12 g carbohydrates; 2 g protein; 3 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 7 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,043 IU vitamin A; 84 mg vitamin C; 30 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 376 mg sodium; 486 mg potassium Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (140% daily value), Vitamin A (21% dv) Carbohydrate Servings: 1 Exchanges: 2 vegetable, 2½ fat
About this recipe
This vegan side dish is traditionally served at room temperature with grilled meat or fish, but feel free to double your portion and eat it as a vegan entree with crusty bread for dipping in that garlicky, flavor-packed olive oil. The name for this combination of roasted vegetables comes from the Catalan escalivar, meaning to cook in ashes, though most folks these days use an oven or grill to put some char on their veggies.
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